Physics Reader Bundle

$76.00

Physics Reader Set  (12 Books)
  • What is Physics?

    In What is Physics?, young readers learn that physicists ask lots of questions about how the world works. How fast can a kid run? What happens when a ball is thrown? Why does popcorn pop? How can birds and planes fly?
  • Force

    In Force, young readers learn that force is described as any action that changes the location or shape of an object or how fast or slowly it moves (speed). Examples of force are given.
  • Energy

    In Energy, young readers are introduced to energy—a basic concept in physics. Energy is what is needed to do work, which occurs when a force moves an object. Force is any action that changes the location, shape, or speed of an object. Food gives the body the energy it needs to do work. Energy comes in many forms.
  • Work

    In Work, young readers are introduced to work—a basic concept in physics. Work happens when a force moves an object. Force is any action that changes the location, shape, or speed of an object. Examples are given to show how work, force, and distance are related.
  • Inertia

    In Inertia, young readers are introduced to basic scientific concepts about inertia. In physics, inertia is when an object resists a change in motion. Inertia keeps objects that are in motion moving and objects that are not moving at rest. Force is any action that changes the location, shape, or speed of an object.
  • Baseballs, Hockey Pucks, and Busy Ants

    In Baseballs, Hockey Pucks, and Busy Ants, young readers are introduced to the scientific concept of linear motion. Physics defines any object moving in a straight line as having linear motion. Objects such as hockey pucks, baseballs, bicycles, ants, snails, horses, and people all have linear motion when they are moving in a straight line.
  • Wheels on a Bike

    In Wheels on a Bike, young readers are introduced to the scientific concept of rotational motion. Physics defines any object moving around a center point as using rotational motion. The wheels of a bike moving in a straight line use linear motion and, as they turn, the wheels also use rotational motion.
  • Zappity ZAP ZAP

    In Zappity, Zap, Zap, young readers are introduced to electricity—a basic physics concept. Electricity is a general term for electrical energy. The movement of electrons from atom to atom creates the electrical energy that makes batteries and toasters work and doorknobs give shocks.
  • Magnets

    In Magnets, young readers are introduced to the physics of magnets. The alignment of atoms in certain metals creates a magnetic force in a magnet. A magnet has two poles, each pole with an opposite force. Poles that are alike will repel each other and poles that are opposite will attract. Atoms and force are defined.
  • Waves

    In Waves, young readers learn waves are created by the transfer of energy through vibration of molecules. The size of a wave depends on the amount of energy. Molecules in a wave move only slightly up and down or back and forth. A wave has a particular shape. Transverse waves, longitudinal waves, atoms, molecules, and energy are defined.
  • Sound

    In Sound, young readers learn energy causes air molecules to move slightly back and forth, causing a sound wave. The energy is passed from molecule to molecule, and the more energy transferred, the bigger the wave and the louder the sound. We hear because the thin, flexible tympanic membrane in the ear picks up the motion of the molecules in the sound wave.
  • Light We Can See

    In Light We Can See, young readers learn visible light is light we can see with our eyes. Light is a form of energy that plants use to make food and we use to see things with our eyes. Objects can be opaque, transparent, or translucent depending on how the light interacts with them.

What is Physics?

In What is Physics?, young readers learn that physicists ask lots of questions about how the world works. How fast can a kid run? What happens when a ball is thrown? Why does popcorn pop? How can birds and planes fly?

95 in stock

Force

In Force, young readers learn that force is described as any action that changes the location or shape of an object or how fast or slowly it moves (speed). Examples of force are given.

95 in stock

Energy

In Energy, young readers are introduced to energy—a basic concept in physics. Energy is what is needed to do work, which occurs when a force moves an object. Force is any action that changes the location, shape, or speed of an object. Food gives the body the energy it needs to do work. Energy comes in many forms.

95 in stock

Work

In Work, young readers are introduced to work—a basic concept in physics. Work happens when a force moves an object. Force is any action that changes the location, shape, or speed of an object. Examples are given to show how work, force, and distance are related.

95 in stock

Inertia

In Inertia, young readers are introduced to basic scientific concepts about inertia. In physics, inertia is when an object resists a change in motion. Inertia keeps objects that are in motion moving and objects that are not moving at rest. Force is any action that changes the location, shape, or speed of an object.

95 in stock

Baseballs, Hockey Pucks, and Busy Ants

In Baseballs, Hockey Pucks, and Busy Ants, young readers are introduced to the scientific concept of linear motion. Physics defines any object moving in a straight line as having linear motion. Objects such as hockey pucks, baseballs, bicycles, ants, snails, horses, and people all have linear motion when they are moving in a straight line.

95 in stock

Wheels on a Bike

In Wheels on a Bike, young readers are introduced to the scientific concept of rotational motion. Physics defines any object moving around a center point as using rotational motion. The wheels of a bike moving in a straight line use linear motion and, as they turn, the wheels also use rotational motion.

95 in stock

Zappity ZAP ZAP

In Zappity, Zap, Zap, young readers are introduced to electricity—a basic physics concept. Electricity is a general term for electrical energy. The movement of electrons from atom to atom creates the electrical energy that makes batteries and toasters work and doorknobs give shocks.

95 in stock

Magnets

In Magnets, young readers are introduced to the physics of magnets. The alignment of atoms in certain metals creates a magnetic force in a magnet. A magnet has two poles, each pole with an opposite force. Poles that are alike will repel each other and poles that are opposite will attract. Atoms and force are defined.

18 in stock

Waves

In Waves, young readers learn waves are created by the transfer of energy through vibration of molecules. The size of a wave depends on the amount of energy. Molecules in a wave move only slightly up and down or back and forth. A wave has a particular shape. Transverse waves, longitudinal waves, atoms, molecules, and energy are defined.

20 in stock

Sound

In Sound, young readers learn energy causes air molecules to move slightly back and forth, causing a sound wave. The energy is passed from molecule to molecule, and the more energy transferred, the bigger the wave and the louder the sound. We hear because the thin, flexible tympanic membrane in the ear picks up the motion of the molecules in the sound wave.

19 in stock

Light We Can See

In Light We Can See, young readers learn visible light is light we can see with our eyes. Light is a form of energy that plants use to make food and we use to see things with our eyes. Objects can be opaque, transparent, or translucent depending on how the light interacts with them.

19 in stock

18 in stock

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