Biology Reader Bundle: The Basics

$88.75

Biology Reader Set (14 Books) 
  • What is Biology?

    In What is Biology? young readers are introduced to biology, the study of living things. Examples are basic concepts—living things eat, grow, and move; plants make their food; living things are found in different environments; biologists study living things.
  • Life

    In Life young readers begin to explore basic concepts about living things. Fundamental science facts are explained through simply written text and fun illustrations. Learn that living things grow and move, need food, reproduce, come in all sizes, and are found almost everywhere.
  • The Cell: A Tiny City

    In The Cell: A Tiny City young readers begin to explore the biology of the cell. Students learn that cells are made of special molecules, like protein and DNA. Proteins are molecules that do all of the work inside cells. DNA is a double strand of atoms linked together that has a code that tells cells what to do. Proteins and DNA work together to make the cell function. (students should be familiar with Chemistry Readers, Proteins and DNA)
  • Plant Cells vs Animal Cells

    In Plant Cells vs. Animal Cells, young readers learn that plants and animals have different types of cells. Both types have a cell membrane and organelles, including a nucleus, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Some differences: plant cells have a stiff outer cell wall and make food from sunlight; animal cells don’t have a cell wall and can’t make their own food.
  • Mushrooms, Molds, and Bread Bugs!

    In Mushrooms, Molds, and Bread Bugs!, young readers learn about mushrooms, molds, and yeast—fungi. Some are edible, some poisonous, and they come in different sizes. They do not make their own food but eat dead plants and animals, breaking them down into atoms and molecules which are left in the soil for plants to use.
  • Bacteria and Archaea

    In Bacteria and Archaea, young readers learn about the biology of bacteria and archaea, organisms too small to be seen with only the eyes. Students learn that bacteria are shaped like rods, spheres, or spirals and live alone or in colonies, and archaea come in different shapes and can live in very hot or very salty places.
  • Protozoa

    In Protozoa, young readers learn about microscopic called protozoa. Students learn about how Euglena move by twirling a long tail called a flagellum and can use sunlight to make their own food. Students also learn how Paramecia swim and gather food using tiny hairs called cilia and Amoebas crawl and eat using “false feet.”
  • Microscopes

    In Microscopes, young readers are introduced to an important scientific instrument--the microscope. A microscope can magnify objects that are too small to be seen with the eyes alone. A light microscope is described and pictured. Other types of microscopes can be used to see smaller things, even atoms. Some microscopic images are included.
  • Photosynthesis

    In Photosynthesis, young learn that plants use sunlight to make food during photosynthesis. Chlorophyll makes plants green and is a molecule that catches the sunlight, sending it to the chloroplast, an organelle in plant cells that makes sugar. Some plants use photosynthesis all year; some don’t. Atoms, molecules, cells, and organelles are reviewed. (Students should be familiar with Chemistry Readers Atoms and Molecules, and Biology Readers The Cell: A Tiny City, and Plant vs. Animal Cells)
  • Viruses

    In Viruses, young readers learn that although viruses are too small to be seen with only our eyes, they are made of atoms and molecules and are not considered alive by most scientists as they do not have all the parts of a cell. They can cause diseases and must live in other organisms.
  • Plants

    In Plants, young readers discover that plants grow almost everywhere. Stems, leaves, roots, flowers, fruit, and seeds are described along with their functions. The plant life cycle is pictured and described. Wind, bugs, and animals move seeds to different places.
  • Animals

    In Animals, young readers are introduced to basic information about animals. Animals have different characteristics, such as fur, scales, wings, and different numbers of legs. Animals live almost everywhere: in the ground, water, and trees. Some animals live in houses, and some build their own homes.
  • Sea Jellies

    In Sea Jellies, young readers learn basic scientific concepts about sea jellies, soft-bodied animals that live in oceans around the world. They have different shapes and sizes and swim by moving water in and out of their body. Some have tentacles used to catch food, and oral arms that move the food toward the mouth.
  • Sponges

    In Sponges, young readers learn Sponges live in oceans and fresh water. Some look like plants, but sponges are animals because they are made of animal cells. They are soft-bodied, vary in size from small to very big, and come in different colors and shapes. Cells, atoms, and molecules are described.

What is Biology?

In What is Biology? young readers are introduced to biology, the study of living things. Examples are basic concepts—living things eat, grow, and move; plants make their food; living things are found in different environments; biologists study living things.

94 in stock

Life

In Life young readers begin to explore basic concepts about living things. Fundamental science facts are explained through simply written text and fun illustrations. Learn that living things grow and move, need food, reproduce, come in all sizes, and are found almost everywhere.

94 in stock

The Cell: A Tiny City

In The Cell: A Tiny City young readers begin to explore the biology of the cell. Students learn that cells are made of special molecules, like protein and DNA. Proteins are molecules that do all of the work inside cells. DNA is a double strand of atoms linked together that has a code that tells cells what to do. Proteins and DNA work together to make the cell function. (students should be familiar with Chemistry Readers, Proteins and DNA)

93 in stock

Plant Cells vs Animal Cells

In Plant Cells vs. Animal Cells, young readers learn that plants and animals have different types of cells. Both types have a cell membrane and organelles, including a nucleus, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Some differences: plant cells have a stiff outer cell wall and make food from sunlight; animal cells don’t have a cell wall and can’t make their own food.

93 in stock

Mushrooms, Molds, and Bread Bugs!

In Mushrooms, Molds, and Bread Bugs!, young readers learn about mushrooms, molds, and yeast—fungi. Some are edible, some poisonous, and they come in different sizes. They do not make their own food but eat dead plants and animals, breaking them down into atoms and molecules which are left in the soil for plants to use.

94 in stock

Bacteria and Archaea

In Bacteria and Archaea, young readers learn about the biology of bacteria and archaea, organisms too small to be seen with only the eyes. Students learn that bacteria are shaped like rods, spheres, or spirals and live alone or in colonies, and archaea come in different shapes and can live in very hot or very salty places.

94 in stock

Protozoa

In Protozoa, young readers learn about microscopic called protozoa. Students learn about how Euglena move by twirling a long tail called a flagellum and can use sunlight to make their own food. Students also learn how Paramecia swim and gather food using tiny hairs called cilia and Amoebas crawl and eat using “false feet.”

94 in stock

Microscopes

In Microscopes, young readers are introduced to an important scientific instrument--the microscope. A microscope can magnify objects that are too small to be seen with the eyes alone. A light microscope is described and pictured. Other types of microscopes can be used to see smaller things, even atoms. Some microscopic images are included.

94 in stock

Photosynthesis

In Photosynthesis, young learn that plants use sunlight to make food during photosynthesis. Chlorophyll makes plants green and is a molecule that catches the sunlight, sending it to the chloroplast, an organelle in plant cells that makes sugar. Some plants use photosynthesis all year; some don’t. Atoms, molecules, cells, and organelles are reviewed. (Students should be familiar with Chemistry Readers Atoms and Molecules, and Biology Readers The Cell: A Tiny City, and Plant vs. Animal Cells)

94 in stock

Viruses

In Viruses, young readers learn that although viruses are too small to be seen with only our eyes, they are made of atoms and molecules and are not considered alive by most scientists as they do not have all the parts of a cell. They can cause diseases and must live in other organisms.

94 in stock

Plants

In Plants, young readers discover that plants grow almost everywhere. Stems, leaves, roots, flowers, fruit, and seeds are described along with their functions. The plant life cycle is pictured and described. Wind, bugs, and animals move seeds to different places.

94 in stock

Animals

In Animals, young readers are introduced to basic information about animals. Animals have different characteristics, such as fur, scales, wings, and different numbers of legs. Animals live almost everywhere: in the ground, water, and trees. Some animals live in houses, and some build their own homes.

94 in stock

Sea Jellies

In Sea Jellies, young readers learn basic scientific concepts about sea jellies, soft-bodied animals that live in oceans around the world. They have different shapes and sizes and swim by moving water in and out of their body. Some have tentacles used to catch food, and oral arms that move the food toward the mouth.

94 in stock

Sponges

In Sponges, young readers learn Sponges live in oceans and fresh water. Some look like plants, but sponges are animals because they are made of animal cells. They are soft-bodied, vary in size from small to very big, and come in different colors and shapes. Cells, atoms, and molecules are described.

94 in stock

93 in stock

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